We love Reviewing Math Skills!

This week we decided that each day after our math lesson, we wanted to have a lot of new math centers that review the concepts we’ve learned this year! The Busy Class and K-5 Math Teaching Resources came to rescue Mrs. Felter and give her some great ideas! We set up new expectations for our math center time. Here are the rules we established:

Expectations for Math Centers

  1. Have a positive attitude about centers and partners.
  2. Read the directions before asking for help!
  3. Stay focused the whole time.
  4. Organize your materials and clean up when you’re done.
  5. All done? Clean up & find Mrs. F for a new center!

With these new expectations, that we created ourselves, we are having a fabulous time! Here we are hard at work.Busy Class Centers 3Busy Class CentersBusy Class Centers 5 Busy Class Center 2   Busy Class Centers 4

Learning Comes Alive!

What a wonderful surprise I had when I looked out our classroom’s window yesterday! I spied some familiar looking, hard working botanists! Mr. Bar, our science expert, helped our class plant sunflower, marigold, and corn seeds in our school garden.They used shovels to dig holes in the garden. The students also learned about not digging too deep, so that the plants are able to grow and survive. If you dig too deep the plant can’t grow because it isn’t getting enough energy from the sun. Mr. Bar also explained that when you plant the seeds in the ground you can’t pat the dirt down too hard or too tight because the stem can’t get out of the soil! After planting the seeds, they watered the ground. They learned that plants need the exact right amount of sun, water, and soil to grow. Too much of any one thing can cause the plant not to grow!

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Click here for a wonderful plant website! Learn about seed growth, parts of a flower, seed dispersal, and plant identification.

Math in Action!

We took our whole class math block to a whole new level this week! We played “Agree, Argue, Aspire”, worked in teams and independently, took our fraction knowledge deeper, and capped it all off with multiplication Jeopardy! Our class was focused and engaged all week long, and you have made me so proud!

We studied Karmyn’s work on her practice EOG test. Check out how she tried three different strategies before getting an answer with which she was confident! Karmyn’s work showed us that she can truly persevere when things get tough. Her example gave us a lot to aspire to!

Don’t be afraid to try more than one strategy!

Never be afraid to start all over!

Here we are studying Karmyn’s work and deciding what we agreed with, what we wanted to argue with, and what we could aspire to do in our own work!

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If you’d like to try out multiplication Jeopardy at home click on the picture below. Get your family involved! See if you can beat your siblings and parents! Remember your good sportsmanship. Even though the girls were our big winner our boys acted like true gentlemen!

More Crazy English!

Last week, we discussed how often times in English, authors use words and phrases that say one thing when they really mean something else. We said that figurative language helps authors “spice up their writing,” or make it more interesting.

We know when we say, “Kyan is a brain” we are using a metaphor to describe Kyan as smart!

Saying, “Nancy is as bright as a lightbulb,” is simile that is comparing Nancy to a lightbulb because she is bright. We can use our context clues to infer that this simile means Nancy is smart!

We also discussed personification. Can you think of some examples of times when we give human characteristics to things that are not human?

Idioms are another type of figurative language. Idioms are combinations of words that mean something very different than what they say. Here are some examples to think about:

 

 

Decomposing a Kilogram

On Monday, we sat down and took a kilogram apart. A kilogram is a unit that is used to measure weight. Often grocery store items are measured in kilograms. We learned that:

1 kg = 1 kilogram!

By decomposing a kilogram we discovered that:

1 kilogram = 1,000 grams or

1 kg = 1 g!

We also determined that 100 grams could go into a kilogram 10 times and 10 grams could go into 100 grams 10 times! Check out these mathematicians at work!

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Thank you EngageNy.Org for the wonderful lesson idea!

Biography Research

Yesterday, we researched our entrepreneurs and inventors on the internet. We found some valuable information, but internet research is never as easy as it seems. Let’s take a step back to see what we did well and where we need support.

1. What key words did you use to do your search?

2. How many websites did you visit?

3. Did you stay on websites that were too hard to read?

4. How much research were you able to do?techies 5

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Adding up our Pennies for Pasta

In room B11 we are determine to help children suffering with Leukemia! We have been collecting pennies (and other silver coins as well) to donate to Leukemia Cancer research! We have used our Pennies for Pasta change as a big part of our math lessons this week. We realized that counting one penny at as time was not an efficient strategy! We started counting by twos, then tens. Then we realized making groups of ten, by counting the ten pennies up by twos worked best! We counted groups of tens until we had ten groups or one dollar. We are excited to help our school reached their goal of $2,000.00 for Cancer research. Which class will raise the most money and get a lunch from the Olive Garden?!

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Realistic Fiction- A Chance to get Creative!

When we write realistic fiction stories we ask ourselves, “What would happen if…”

We had some great ideas: What if we had a corgi puppy as our class pet? What if Kyan had his own house? What if someone stole Ixell’s new shoes? What if Richard lived in Hollywood. Below, two of our writers, are sharing their excellent realistic fiction stories.

Amorie’s Realistic Fiction

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Andre’s Realistic Fiction

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Brainstorm, Plan, and Keep Planning

Just like our favorite author,Barbara O’Connor and Phyllis Reynolds Naylor, when we write our narrative stories we start by making a plan. Below, some of our class authors are showing off the fantastic plans they are using to write a story. Notice the way they have planned for the beginning, middle, and end of their stories as well as a climax, or big moment. The students have also included what their secondary characters will be doing at certain points in their stories.

Kyan’s Plan:
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Ixell’s plan and her engaging lead:
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Antwan’s plan and his engaging lead: photo 1
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